How-to

How to Remove Links From ATV or UTV Tire Chains

How to Remove Links From ATV Tire Chains

When you’ve gotten out into a great off-roading experience and get into a situation where you need your chains, there’s nothing worse than realizing that they’re too big and you’re stuck. Adjusting the fit of your chains is a fairly common procedure due to the differences in tire sizes. It’s pretty easy and straightforward to remove links from your ATV tire chains before you need them with just a little time and effort.

Here is a simple tutorial on how to remove links from your ATV tire chains to get a great custom fit:

1. Put the chains on by spreading them out either behind or in front of your ATV, then back the tires onto them, preferably with the easier to fasten side on the inside, so that the harder to fasten side is where you can see it easily. There are slotted ramps available that can make this process easier by holding the chains in the correct position.
Put the chains on by spreading them
fasten the chains as tightly as possible

2. Try to fasten the chains as tightly as possible. Be sure to put a chain tensioner on to take up slack. Drive 1/4 mile and re-tighten. If you have more than two or three extra links when fastening, you’re going to want to remove the excess chain. To do this, you can use a pair of heavy bolt-cutters, a cutoff wheel on a Dremel or similar tool, or similar process after removing the chains from the tire.

fasten the chains

3. If trimming them back will put a cross chain past or too close to your fastener to be able to tighten it easily, you will need to remove the close cross chain. To do this, you will need to remove the chains from the ATV, and wearing safety glasses, use a cold chisel and hammer to loosen the joining link that attaches the cross chain to the side chain by turning the joining link sideways, wedging the cold chisel into the joint and striking the chisel with the hammer. Once the joining links is loose, repeat on the other side.

trimming chains

4. Don’t forget that you will need to engage the tightening lever or cam and possibly put a chain tensioner on to help keep the chains snug against the wheel. If you do have spare links on the side chains, you’ll want to fasten them down to prevent damage to your fender wells. You will also want to keep your speed down while you’ve got chains on as well, preferably under 25 miles per hour.

It’s important to remember that properly fitted chains have up to twice the life expectancy as poorly fitted chains due to broken links, excessive wear and similar issues.

By taking a little care to make sure they are properly fitted at the start and taking a little time to maintain them by letting them dry properly, fixing broken links and other issues will make your investment last a long time and give you every bit of performance you need out of them. Check uot our Best ATV Tire Chains for Ice Fishing Review to find out more anout last product updates on the market

About the author

Mattew Brodie

Mattew Brodie

Hi there! This blog was created to share my off-roading, gear-related knowledge with those interested in the field. I’ve worked as mechanic for years and have been a devoted off-roader for as long. Now, I’ve decided to combine the two and share my experience with passionate audience. I do not claim to know it all – but when something new hits the surface, I will be on it to research its ups and downs. Call me an off-roading nerd if you like, and as long as you can find something useful in here – you are heartedly welcome!

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment

error: Content is protected !!